May I know my value and my worth

May I know my value and my worth

May I remember that I am appreciated

May I know that I am deeply loved

May I enjoy my pleasure and success

When it’s hard, it’s hard!

When very difficult things happen in your life, it’s hard.

You can think about it in 1000 different ways, practice breathing, swim, take walks, chat with friends, eat chocolate. It’s still hard, and you still have to live through the hard times.

It’s true, the walks and chocolate and swims all help. Sometimes it helps to read a passage from an inspiring book. Sometimes it helps to watch Perry Mason or “Without a Trace” find the good guys and bring the bad guys to justice. Or it’s laughing with friends.

Then you realize that the time is hard, so you take a breath, close your eyes, and start all over again.

Pay extra close attention to every breath, from the time it starts in… As you experience the breath like this, take a moment to notice that in this moment, you’re not suffering. Watch your breath come in and go out, and experience the passing of time, of life, and of thoughts. In this moment, you’re not trying to make anything happen. In this moment you have some equanimity. Notice the equanimity.

zen poet Norman Fisher, meditation instructions

I sometimes remind students , ‘Try not to duck. Try to see the truth of your experience right now. Try to be there.’ When we are in contention with the moment, we push it away and then we don’t see it clearly. When we see things clearly, we can usually figure them out.

Sylvia Boorstein, Greet This Moment as a Friend

Solid Ground: Buddhist Wisdom for Difficult Times

Joys of a phone call

One good thing: When I get a call from someone who takes the time to ask about what’s happening with my day, my project, my life, and tell me about their own life.

What a nice gift that is.

Much as I love getting calls from dear friends — in general, I do hate having to make phone calls. I gird myself with a list, take a breath, make one call after another.

Once I’m on the phone, it’s all fine.

If it’s a friend, I love to check in and share what’s happening in my life and theirs.

If it’s a challenge — the broken computer connection or phone reception that will not work — I know the steps, and keep plugging till I get results. My daughter’s friend told her I’m a tiger (thanks!).

PS A 23-kazoo birthday call is a very special call, indeed!!

Inside vs Outside

One good thing (found on a tree in Berkeley).

Such a discovery!

Finding one good thing every day – reminds us that even in the midst of a sea of unknowns, life offers us joys if we only notice them.

Last night we ventured to Gather Restaurantin Berkeley, for a late-night meal that had the most unique, delicious and interesting food ever! The amazing roasted flavor of a pasta-like vegetable with smoked porcini mushrooms (try the Yuba “pappardelle” – smoked okara “Bolognese” nama yuba, rapini, roasted porcini).

Dinner with your dear daughter is a wonderful bonus.

Check out a cool vide of the food HERE

 

 

 

 

 

Dance with Matt: It’s wonderful!

Check out this wonderful video of Matt – dancing around the world

and
I have no idea who Matt is … or how he got the idea to do this, but it’s waaay cool. Reminds us that — even in a rocky transition — doing something silly or watching someone else doing something silly is marvelous!
So Matt travels around the world, dances his silly dance, and invites people to let him film them dancing with him, while he dances his funny dance. You don’t have to know how to dance – you just have fun!
Enjoy dancing!

Inspired by Awesome

The Book of Awesome is the first Awesome thing I’m posting, inspired by 1000awesomethings.

In a time of chaos, Neil Pasricha began to compile the “awesome” ordinary experiences he had every day. Here’s how he got started!

Pasricha’s blog, 1000awesomethings.com lists Awesome daily pleasures – like putting on clothes still warm from the dryer;  finally getting rid of the thing in your car trunk that’s been rolling around forever; being last in the grocery line and invited to come to a new lane that’s just opened.

He enjoyed his listings, they made him feel better, and dozens and hundreds and millions of people began to look at what he was posting. His blog won a Webby award as “best blog.” He was invited to put his posts in a book that was profiled in the New Yorker, and he was invited to give a talk on TED about his approach to remind us of the Awesome things in ordinary life.

What a good idea!!

No solid ground

I’ve always hated the Buddhist insistence that “everything changes.”

Yet I’m starting to recognize the virtue of the “everything changes” in my own chaotic life. That means the difficult and scarey times in my life are likely to change, too.

The problem is, you have to stop and take a look at the difficult and scarey moments before they can move on.

Not so easy. TV off, computer off, books closed. Sitting on the couch, taking a breath, feeling a wave of adrenaline and tightening of the chest. Urgh. The lump in the throat, quick shallow breathing, glimpse of the sunshine bright on the tree across the street. Children are giggling in the house next door. The wind moves a tree branch, then it settles. A bird flits across the sky.

At this moment, nothing bad is happening! What a revelation.

Pay extra close attention to every breath, from the time it starts in… As you experience the breath like this, take a moment to notice that in this moment, you’re not suffering. Watch your breath come in and go out, and experience the passing of time, of life, and of thoughts. In this moment, you’re not trying to make anything happen. In this moment you have some equanimity. Notice the equanimity.

zen poet Norman Fisher, meditation instructions

I sometimes remind students , ‘Try not to duck. Try to see the truth of your experience right now. Try to be there.’ When we are in contention with the moment, we push it away and then we don’t see it clearly. When we see things clearly, we can usually figure them out.

Sylvia Boorstein, Greet This Moment as a Friend

Solid Ground: Buddhist Wisdom for Difficult Times

•••

Ninety-eight percent of what I worried about never happened.” —Mark Twain.